Blue Gold: World Water Wars - Forum
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Forum » Additional Suggested Movies » Unit 8 » Blue Gold: World Water Wars
Blue Gold: World Water Wars
LunowDate: Thursday, 2011-06-23, 10:39 PM | Message # 1
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Blue Gold: World Water Wars

Narrated by Malcolm McDowell, this award-winning documentary from director Sam Bozzo posits that we're moving closer to a world in which water -- a seemingly plentiful natural resource -- could actually incite war. As water becomes an increasingly precious commodity, corrupt governments, corporations and even private investors are scrambling to control it … which leaves everyday citizens fighting for a substance they need to survive. - from Netflix

This movie provides a useful introduction to one of the most serious issues facing the future of the planet: fresh water. However, I must admit that while I think that the film makers (who won some awards with this movie) have their heart in a good place, their movie shows a very strong anti-corporate bias. While I am sure that their information is accurate, there seems to be an almost total blame for the destruction of the world's water-supply placed at the door of corporations.

So, despite the bias, I would say that this is worth watching. It shows the interaction of people and their environment (unit 1), as well as the role of corporations in the purchase of water supplies (unit 4 and 5), and also the threat of losing our planet's water supply (unit 8).
 
TienDDate: Friday, 2013-01-04, 1:16 AM | Message # 2
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I give this documentary a 4.5/5. I really liked it personally.

Jim Burroughs spent two years in Bangladesh examining its water issues. Throughout the documentary, he pointed out the water issues of two other countries. One is the Netherlands, which had a terrible flood in 1953. Another country is the United States, with the horrible Katrina flood a few years back. According to Malcolm McDowell (the narrator), the Brahmaputra River in Tibet flows to India, and then to Bangladesh where water is most needed. The river provides 65% of Bangladesh's fresh water. Dams of India can cut off that water, causing drought, or the release of flood into Bangladesh. Since it’s a very low-lying country, Bangladesh is vulnerable to huge floods and droughts from India’s control of the waters running through its country. People from Bangladesh and from India often protest India's water policies.

The documentary demonstrates how “water is used faster than it can be replenished,” said the narrator, Malcolm McDowell. We're also polluting, destroying the wetlands, and blocking the rivers that keep the water and lands fertile. Basically, we're turning the planet into deserts. This documentary really ties in with Unit 8, which mainly focuses on future resource issues. It shows that we really need to change the way we use water if we want keep this precious resource in the future. I highly recommend this documentary. It really widened my eyes and helped me realized that this mere crisis is in fact happening.


Message edited by TienD - Friday, 2013-01-04, 1:26 AM
 
jimynDate: Sunday, 2015-04-12, 7:19 PM | Message # 3
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voy a ver esta pelicula

Added (2015-04-12, 7:19 PM)
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ok i can't edit my previous comment for some reason, so i have to make another one

Personally, just looking at the title I thought it was going to be about the polar ice caps melting and how we're all going to turn into pirates looking for 'dryland' like in Waterworld, but this is definitely scarier.

The main idea that the documentary is trying to address is the fact that we are basically using up all of our freshwater resources before it can be resupplied. If I recall correctly we are either using up 15x or 50x more than we should be. It doesn't matter which one it is, this is really concerning. The film brings up many facts that I did not  not know about. For example, the loss of freshwater can lead to earthquakes, sinkholes (if i remember correctly), and soil that can not be used.

There has been many protests and solutions to stop the abuse of our freshwater resources, but one that stood out to me the most was the man who stabbed himself on stage. For someone to take their own life means one of the three: he's crazy,feeling great sadness, or he has a deep passion for something. His death was a message to everyone around the world, that this water crisis can not be brushed off.

Overall, this film was interesting,but I regret watching this,because it adds another thing to worry about. I would give this film the film 7/10. It was interesting, but it failed to keep me interested all the way, b/c three-fourths of the way through I became a little bored. However the film did a great job on addressing the problem and exploiting its causes and consequences!

Message edited by jimyn - Wednesday, 2015-04-08, 10:57 PM
 
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